disgruntledturtle:

officialcaesarsalazar:

A fairy tale where a child is cursed and the spell can only be broken with true love’s kiss.
Their mother then gently kisses them on the forehead and the spell is broken.
After all, love isn’t just romantic.

didn’t this exact thing happen in once upon a time

(via expertcrystal)

"Writing Advice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot, leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically, writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example: “During roll call, in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing, you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters, you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

"

(via 1000wordseveryday)

I need to go back to school.

(via cordeliagablewrites)inspiration

(via thescienceofobsession)

My learning is ofwficially insignificant. My writing minor and all those classes do not make me as qualified as reading this has.

(via kikukachan)

…It’s something to try. If the technique works for you, use it. If it doesn’t, toss it over your shoulder and try something else. All the writing advice out there is like a huge virtual hardware store, and all of us who’re concerned about leaning to do what we do better are wandering up and down the aisles together, looking for the tools that will work for us. There are a thousand thousand ways to write well, no two of them exactly alike, and neither are the tools used in the work. So pull techniques off the racks, try them out, see if they perform as advertised. Then get to work…

(via dduane)

(Source: wingedbeastie, via theheroheart)

xxcalmxx Asked:
Jazz is so not "all American"

it totally is, it’s roots may not be, but it was developed in the south and more was added to it was it spread to places like New York, Chicago, and Kansas City

itistimetodisappear:

thedorkiestviking:

ibeggedformercytwice:

ibeggedformercytwice:

ibeggedformercytwice:

My medieval servant boy has gone missing. I’ll just use Google to see if I can find him.

image

Oh bother.

I still say this was hilarious fuck you guys

GODDAMNIT

GET OUT

(via theheroheart)

annabellioncourt:

plz-no:

Simultaneously the worst and best movie ever made

Actually one of my teachers watched every single version of Romeo and Juliet with the original text in front of him to prove that this was the worst version, but to his great dismay its the most accurate film adaptation of it, with the lines closest to the original text and most similar stage direction and relayed emotions.

He proceeded to show it to us in class.

(Source: fuckyeah-chickflicks, via mikeliterous)

shahrezad1:

Well, this version of the meme is actually rather appropriate considering who’s saying it. XD

(Source: thewinterdruid, via rubyredwolves)

kristoffkriston:

findsomethingtofightfor:

ghostgirlninja1122:

I was just looking at this gif and noticed something. Anna’s ice form is so cold, that it actually starts to freeze Han’s sword as it gets closer to her hand. I never knew why it broke but now I do. It’s so beautiful and terrifying at the same time.

You know I never actually thought about that! Which would make sense why Elsa could touch her because with her powers the cold/ice wouldn’t bother her. But if anyone else touched Anna her frozen form might have hurt them (I’m thinking like what dry ice can do to someone).

Which just gutted me more because that means Elsa went from being the only person who couldn’t touch Anna to the only person who could. 

image

(via agentrodgers)

pep-o-mint:

spine-is2spoopy:

vvidget:

THE BEST COOKIE RECIPES :D

The Brownie Cookie Recipe

Chocolate Chunk Cookies

Crème Brûlée Cookies

Butterscotch Apple Pudding Cookies

Deep Dish S’mores Cookies

Buckeye Brownie Cookies

Caramel Stuffed Truffle Cookies

Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Whoopie Pies

Chocolate Chip Peanut Butter Cup Cookie Sandwiches

Deep Dish Milky Way Cookies

can I eat all of them at once please 

reblogging for future reference omfg 

(via mikeliterous)

Everything Is Awesome: The Lego Movie end title.

Creative Director: Brian Mah. Production Studio: Alma Mater. Technique: Stop-motion with 60,000 LEGO pieces.

(via mikeliterous)

Anonymous Asked:
what the fuck is frozen even about?

vikingsarebetter:

Once upon a time, in a land by the sea,
There were two princesses who were happy as could be.
The eldest was Elsa, possessing Ice magic.
And her sister was Anna. Their tale is quite tragic.
For one night young Elsa, while playing a game,
Caused harm to young Anna. Things were never the same.
To protect everyone, Elsa locked herself away.
She refused to build snowmen, though why she wouldn’t say.

The King and Queen die and now Elsa is queen
It’s been years now since either princess has been seen.
Anna meets Hans and it’s love at first sight.
But Elsa is cautious. It doesn’t feel right.
The two sisters argue, Elsa’s magic’s revealed.
Elsa runs and lets go of what was so long concealed.
Anna goes after her sister so dear.
With the help of Kristoff and Olaf and Sven the reindeer.

They find Elsa’s palace. The girls sing a duet.
But then Elsa does something she’s sure to regret.
A strong blast of magic straight to Anna’s heart
Elsa’s fear and her sadness makes her fall apart.
Kristoff takes Anna to see his troll friends.
And they give us a hint to how the story ends.
An act of true love is what must save the day.
They must get Anna to Hans for a kiss straight away.

Kristoff rides valiantly but all is in vain,
Hans didn’t love Anna. He wanted to reign.
Hans leaves Anna to freeze and to die,
Then Olaf just happens to be strolling by.
They have a discussion where Anna finds out,
What an act of true love is really about.
So they go to find Kristoff, while a storm starts to brew.
Kristoff rushes back. His love for Anna is true.

But Anna decides that her life is worth less
Than her sister’s, who is in a bit of distress.
Anna rushes in front of the man who betrayed,
Sacrifices herself to be cut down by his blade.
At the last moment she freezes, and then Anna died.
Everyone is quite sad and a few people cried.
But turns out that Anna’s love for Elsa is true.
She thaws and they hug but there’s still work to do.

Arendelle thaws and summer returns.
Anna punches Hans right between his flowing sideburns.
Anna and Kristoff share a kiss and it’s great
Then all of the characters start to ice skate.